×
infrastructure week continues
February 13, 2018

President Trump promoted his infrastructure plan on Tuesday, which has been blasted by even some conservative critics as "a joke." Released Monday, the White House proposes leveraging $200 billion in federal spending into $1.5 trillion worth of projects, mostly by asking state and local governments to match the funds by as much as a 4-to-1 ratio.

The proposal would also see the government selling off or privatizing assets like Dulles and Reagan National airports, freeways, aqueducts, and electrical facilities.

Politico notes that Trump's plan "is not going anywhere eight months before Election Day — and that's according to Republicans, not Democrats." Jeva Lange

January 22, 2018

A leaked draft of the White House's infrastructure plan has surfaced over at Axios, and although specific funding numbers are not attached, the document offers the first details in what has so far been a fairly confusing process.

What we know: The $1 trillion infrastructure plan is one of President Trump's biggest campaign promises, and there is a lot at stake for his administration in how it gets executed. The leaked document breaks down spending into categories, where infrastructure incentives make up 50 percent of total appropriation and encourage "state, local, and private investment in core infrastructure by providing incentives in the form of grants." Transformative projects, which "must be exploratory and ground-breaking ideas," make up 10 percent, rural infrastructure makes up 25 percent, federal credit programs 7 percent, and the federal capital financing fund 5 percent.

A key detail of the plan is that it prioritizes "projects associated with new, non-federal revenue," transportation expert Yonah Freemark writes, with that accounting for 70 percent of the scoring criteria. "This makes sense as the whole framing of the Trump proposal has been that it is incentivizing '$1 trillion' in spending, "Freemark adds. "This is only possible if other, non-federal, sources of funding become available."

As both Freemark and others noted, grants would also decline from funding upwards of 50 percent of project costs to a ceiling of 20 percent:

Read the full document — which is a draft and subject to change — here, and read more of Freemark's analysis on Twitter. Jeva Lange

See More Speed Reads