×
April 15, 2019

No one is escaping climate change, but some people may have an easier time ignoring it.

As temperatures warm and sea levels rise, Harvard University lecturer Jesse Keenan, an expert on urban development and climate adaptation, has constantly been asked for advice on which cities will see the fewest climate change-related troubles. His top suggestion? Duluth, Minnesota — something he's spun into an entire marketing campaign and selling point for the city, The New York Times reports.

A few factors go into making Duluth the premier climate change destination, the Times notes. It's a cooler area, so even as temperatures increase by 2080, it'll only see summers as hot as Toledo, Ohio's. It's also inland, meaning sea level rise isn't a threat.

If you want more options, Notre Dame's Global Adaptation Index has compiled 270 U.S. cities' risks and readiness when it comes to global warming. You could use it to dispute Buffalo, New York Mayor Byron Brown's claim that his city will be a "climate refuge," or scope out a permanent trip to the well-prepared cities of Ann Arbor, Michigan and Portland, Maine.

A previous study, made interactive by the Times, took the premise of climate change-proof cities global. It showed several cities that have hosted Winter Olympics in the past — most notably 2014's Sochi, Russia site — won't even be cold enough to sustain artificial snow by about 2050. Check out where you'll still be able to ski if no one takes action against catastrophic climate change here. Kathryn Krawczyk

11:31 p.m.

Do you love President Trump and contested land? Consider a move to Trump Heights.

On Sunday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his cabinet met in the disputed Golan Heights to dedicate a small settlement, previously known as Bruchim, to Trump. Now called Ramat Trump, or "Trump Heights," the president can't say it's the biggest, most beautiful settlement — only 10 people live there and it's surrounded by land mines — but it does now have a giant sign, trimmed in gold and flanked by U.S. and Israeli flags. The Syrian border is 12 miles away, while the closest Israeli settlement, Kiryat Shmona, is 30 minutes away.

Netanyahu moved fast; it was only in April that he announced he was renaming the outpost in honor of Trump, to thank him for reversing U.S. policy toward the region. Israel captured the Golan Heights from Syria during the 1967 Six-Day Way, and annexed the territory in 1981, a move most governments consider illegal under international law. During Netanyahu's visit to Washington in March, Trump signed an executive order acknowledging the area, home to about 50,000 people, as Israeli territory. Israel said it hopes the name change will encourage more people to move to Ramat Trump. Catherine Garcia

10:49 p.m.

Argentine President Mauricio Macri on Sunday vowed to fully investigate the massive electrical failure that plunged Argentina and Uruguay into darkness.

Both countries share an electrical grid, and when the electricity was cut off, tens of millions of people were without power. Parts of Chile and Paraguay were also affected. The lights went out on Sunday morning, and by Sunday evening, officials said more than 80 percent of customers in Argentina and 88 percent in Uruguay had power again.

Gustavo Lopetegui, Argentina's energy minister, said the electrical system is "robust," and while "we're not ruling out any possibility ... we don't think it is down to a cyber attack." Argentine media reports that officials are linking the outage to a failure in the transmission of electricity from a hydroelectric dam, BBC News reports. Catherine Garcia

10:19 p.m.

Gary Woodland won the U.S. Open Sunday in Pebble Beach, California, his first major championship.

He was able to defeat Brooks Koepka, the two-time defending champ. Woodland, 35, was in the lead most of Sunday, and shot 2-under-par 69 to finish at 13 under. He started the week ranked No. 25 in the world, with three PGA Tour titles under his belt. Koepka is ranked No. 1 in the world, and was hoping to become the second person to win the U.S. Open three years in a row. Catherine Garcia

9:50 p.m.

Sara Netanyahu, the wife of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, admitted to misusing state funds, and on Sunday was ordered to pay a $15,000 fine.

Netanyahu took a plea deal, with the charges reduced from fraud to intentionally exploiting another person's error. She will have a criminal record. Her lawyer, Yossi Cohen, claims that his client is innocent, and this was an attempt to bring down her husband.

The case was in court for four years, with Netanyahu accused of spending $100,000 on catering between 2010 and 2013, despite having her own personal chef provided by the state, The Guardian reports. Benjamin Netanyahu is also the focus of several corruption investigations, and Israel's attorney general announced earlier this year that he plans on indicting him. Catherine Garcia

8:52 p.m.

In recent weeks, a record number of African migrants have been crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, fleeing from political persecution and economic hardship.

During one week, Border Patrol agents in Texas' Del Rio sector stopped more than 500 African migrants; only 211 African migrants were detained along the entire southern border during the 2018 fiscal year, The Associated Press reports. Most of the migrants are from the Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Angola, and Cameroon. They fly to South America from Africa, then travel by land to the U.S.-Mexico border, with many seeking asylum at ports of entry.

Migrants from Cameroon have said they fly to Ecuador because there is no visa requirement, and it takes about four months to get from there to Tijuana. While in Panama, they are often robbed, AP reports, and held in camps run by the government.

Over the last several days, 170 asylum seekers were bused to Portland, Maine, where Somali refugees were resettled in the 1990s. Hundreds more are expected to arrive in the near future. Catherine Garcia

1:30 p.m.

Washington is bearing witness to, perhaps, the unlikeliest dynamic duo in recent memory.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) are certainly not of the same political ilk, but they've recently gone back and forth over social media, with each expressing a willingness to work with the other to get certain bills passed.

The two politicians are of the same opinion when it comes to banning former lawmakers from becoming lobbyists after their tenures are up, as well as the idea that birth control should be available over-the-counter. They're now trying to team up to pass legislation on both matters.

But, if you thought this was just some political ploy or feigned bipartisanship in a tumultuous era, think again. In an appearance on ABC's This Week, Ocasio-Cortez said she was "extraordinarily excited" to work with Cruz on these issues, admitting that it's a surprise to her, as well. Tim O'Donnell

1:02 p.m.

Tensions between Tehran and Washington continue to rise, especially after the latter accused the former of attacking two oil tankers with limpet mines in the Gulf of Oman last week. U.S. Central Command released a video last week claiming it shows Iranians removing a mine from one of the tankers. Iran has vehemently denied the allegations and the owner of the Japanese tanker disputed the account.

But the video is still enough evidence for some people. Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) on Sunday, in an appearance on CBS' Face the Nation, told host Margaret Brennan that these "unprovoked attacks" warrant a "retaliatory military strike."

Even if Iran is behind the attacks, though, some have pointed out that a U.S. strike would make for a puzzling response, considering neither of the tankers were U.S. ships, instead hailing from Japan and Norway.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), on the other hand, told CNN's Fareed Zakaria on Saturday that the American people have "no appetite" for going to war with Iran. Tim O'Donnell

See More Speed Reads