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April 21, 2017

Before President Trump scoffed at the "ridiculous standard" of measuring a leader's success by his first 100 days in office, he signed and delivered a two-page contract outlining his "100-day action plan to Make America Great Again." But unless Trump gets really, really busy between now and April 29, when he hits 100 days as president, it's looking like he won't exactly check off every promise he made in his "contract with the American voter."

On the first page of the contract, which Trump released when he was still running for office, he pledged to pursue "six measures to clean up the corruption and special interest collusion in Washington, D.C.," "seven actions to protect American workers," and "five actions to restore security and the constitutional rule of law." Those actions included labeling China a currency manipulator (he announced earlier this month he now thinks the Chinese are "not currency manipulators") and suspending immigration for "terror-prone regions" (both of his immigration executive orders have been blocked by federal judges). He has, however, made headway on getting his Supreme Court pick confirmed, rolling back regulations, and pushing "clean coal."

His second page lists the legislative goals he planned to work on with Congress — and boasts even fewer successes. Trump had promised he'd repeal and replace ObamaCare, pass a "middle class tax relief and simplification act," enact an "affordable childcare and eldercare act," and get his proposed U.S.-Mexico border wall fully funded with "the full understanding that the country of Mexico will be reimbursing the United States for the full cost." None of that has happened.

Trump capped off his lengthy list of promises with the bolded line, "This is my pledge to you." "And if we follow these steps, we will once more have a government of, by, and for the people," the contract said.

Read the entirety of Trump's "contract with the American voter" below. Becca Stanek

11:02 a.m. ET
Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anthony Flynn/U.S. Navy via Getty Images

On Thursday morning, the U.S. Navy announced that it had ended the search for three crew members lost in the crash of a Navy aircraft in the Philippine Sea near Okinawa, Japan, on Wednesday. "Our thoughts and prayers are with our lost shipmates and their families," said Rear Adm. Marc Dalton in a statement, as reported by NPR.

The twin-engine, propeller-driven C-2A Greyhound was carrying 11 crew and passengers to the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan when it went down. "[E]ight U.S. Navy and [Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force] ships, three helicopter squadrons, and maritime patrol aircraft covered nearly 1,000 square nautical miles in the search for the missing sailors," the U.S. 7th Fleet said in a statement.

The Navy confirmed an investigation is ongoing. The crash came after the 7th Fleet, based in Japan, had several deadly collisions involving ships in the Pacific. Jeva Lange

10:46 a.m. ET

President Trump is a man who knows how to have a holiday. While the White House has been quick to confirm that the president is doing executive work throughout his stay at Mar-a-Lago this weekend, Trump couldn't help but brag that he is also "quickly" playing 18 holes with Tiger Woods and Dustin Johnson at his course in Jupiter, Florida. "Then back to Mar-a-Lago for talks on bringing even more jobs and companies back to the USA!" he tweeted.

Golfing or not, when tragedy struck abroad on Friday, Trump was quickly back online. "The world cannot tolerate terrorism," he wrote, condemning an attack in Egypt on "defenseless" Sufi Muslim worshipers as "horrible and cowardly." Jeva Lange

10:25 a.m. ET
Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

An estimated 115 million Americans are expected to participate today in the annual bargains bonanza Black Friday, CBS News reports. "Unemployment has dropped, so people are really thinking that folks are going to head to the stores and head online this season," said USA Today business reporter Charisse Jones. "They're thinking sales will be up about 6 percent and $1.4 trillion will be spent by consumers."

Investment banking firm Jefferies found that only 13 percent of customers said they'd be spending more on Black Friday this year, compared to 17 percent last year, indicating that more people are shopping online throughout the month than on just one day. Adobe Analytics reports that this year's "Cyber Monday," for example, could see customers spending $6.6 billion on internet deals.

Read tips for getting the biggest bang for your buck on Black Friday here at The Week. Jeva Lange

10:13 a.m. ET
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Lawyers for President Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, have ended an agreement to share information with Trump's lawyers about Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian election meddling, The New York Times reported Thursday, citing four people involved in the case.

Trump's lawyers reportedly believe the move could mean Flynn is cooperating with Mueller's team. Lawyers sometimes pull out of such information-sharing agreements when their clients start negotiating deals with prosecutors.

Flynn had ties with Moscow before he joined Trump's campaign, and the White House has been preparing for his possible indictment since Mueller's team filed charges in October against Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, campaign aide Rick Gates, and former foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos. Read more about what this means for the Mueller investigation at The New York Times. Jeva Lange

10:06 a.m. ET
STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images

At least 200 people were killed Friday and more than 100 others injured when Islamist militants attacked a Sufi mosque in Egypt's Sinai province, state run news agency MENA reports. "I can't believe they attacked a mosque," one cleric from the town told The New York Times, speaking anonymously out of fear that he could also be attacked.

The attackers planted bombs inside the mosque, then fired on worshipers as they tried to flee, The Associated Press reports. Extremists in the region have targeted Christian churches in the past, but attacks on mosques remain relatively rare. The worshipers at the mosque attacked Friday were Sufi Muslims, who are considered heretical by Sunni extremists. Jeva Lange

November 23, 2017
GoFundMe.com

While driving to Philadelphia in October, Kate McClure ran out of gas. The 27-year-old was stranded and alone on the side of I-95 when a homeless man approached her. The man, whose name was Johnny, told her to get back in the car and lock the doors while he went to get help.

Johnny returned with a can of gas he bought with his last $20, according to The Associated Press.

McClure got to her destination safely but couldn't stop thinking about her savior. So she launched a GoFundMe campaign with a $10,000 goal to get Johnny set up with an apartment, a reliable car, and a few months worth of expenses.

As of Thanksgiving, McClure's campaign has reached more than $200,000. "It just blew up," McClure told AP.

Johnny, 34, who has been without a home in the Philadelphia area for about a year, says he hopes to get a job at the nearby Amazon warehouse in Robinson, New Jersey. Lauren Hansen

November 23, 2017
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Two more women have accused Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) of groping their butts, HuffPost reported Wednesday.

The new allegations come days after radio host and model Leeann Tweeden said Franken kissed and groped her during a 2006 USO tour, and another woman, Lindsay Menz, said Franken squeezed her buttocks while they posed for a photo at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010.

The two new accusers spoke on the condition of anonymity, and said they did not know about each other's stories. Franken told HuffPost: "It's difficult to respond to anonymous accusers, and I don't remember those campaign events." Harold Maass

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