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5 things you need to know now
5 things you need to know now
  • Trump slams McCain for health bill opposition

  • Trump draws pro sports ire for attacks on Curry, Kaepernick

  • New 6.2-magnitude earthquake interrupts rescue efforts in Mexico

  • Merkel expected to win German elections Sunday

  • Unidentified tremors detected in North Korea

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) announced Friday he would not vote for the new Republican health-care bill, effectively killing the GOP's last chance to repeal and replace ObamaCare before their Sept. 30 deadline. Sponsored by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), the unpopular bill would have converted ObamaCare's subsidies and Medicaid payments to block grants to states. The GOP could only lose three votes, and Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) already opposed the bill. President Trump attacked McCain's choice on Twitter Saturday, saying he "never had any intention of voting for this Bill" and accusing McCain of being manipulated by Democrats and betraying "his best friend," Graham.

Source: Huffington Post, The Associated Press

President Trump on Friday issued a profane call to NFL team owners to fire players who engage in peaceful political protest. "Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, 'Get that son of a bitch off the field right now?'" Trump asked a rally audience, referring to players like Colin Kaepernick, formerly of the San Francisco 49ers. Saturday morning on Twitter, Trump turned his attention to Golden State Warriors point guard Stephen Curry. He rescinded the Warriors' invitation to celebrate their NBA championship at the White House because Curry had made comments critical of Trump. The pair of remarks drew the ire of many NFL and NBA athletes and leadership. "Going to White House was a great honor until you showed up!" tweeted LeBron James to Trump.

Source: CBS Sports, HuffPost

Mexico was struck by a 6.2-magnitude earthquake Saturday morning, sparking alarm and suspending ongoing rescue efforts in response to two other recent quakes. The new tremor follows Tuesday's 7.1-magnitude earthquake, as well as an 8.1-magnitude quake that struck off the coast of Mexico earlier this month. The combined death toll from the earlier quakes has nearly reached 400 people. Saturday's tremor, believed to be an aftershock of the 8.1 quake, collapsed a bridge in the town of Juchitan and toppled some previously damaged buildings. "Homes that were still standing just fell down," said Bettina Cruz, who lives in Juchitan. "It's hard. We are all in the streets."

Source: The Associated Press, Reuters

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU) is expected to take the plurality of votes in Germany's election Sunday, securing Merkel her fourth term while necessitating a coalition government. "There are a lot of problems in other countries, think Donald Trump or Brexit," one Berlin voter told NBC News. "With Merkel there is a sense that there is no great problem that she couldn't overcome, and that she's a politician you can trust." Nevertheless, the legislature is expected to increase its partisan diversity, with CDU ceding seats to parties including Alternative for Germany (AfD), a growing right-wing populist group.

Source: NBC News, The Washington Post

As-yet unidentified tremors were detected in North Korea early Saturday near the site of previous nuclear weapons tests. While China labeled the 3.4-magnitude quake a "suspected explosion" that could be Pyongyang's second nuclear test in a matter of weeks, an official from South Korea's meteorological agency said initial assessments indicate it was more likely a natural earthquake. North Korea has not commented either way. On Friday, North Korea's foreign minister said his government might test a hydrogen bomb over the Pacific Ocean. Also Friday, President Trump once again called North Korean leader Kim Jong Un "Rocket Man," the latest in a series of insults the two men have traded this week.

Source: Bloomberg, Reuters
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